Charlotte, do your children not deserve the opportunity to be all that they have the potential to be?

Nimish Bhatt, president of the Carolinas Asian-American Chamber of Commerce, estimates Charlotte employs at least 15,000 workers on H-1B visas. Those employees help the region’s economy, spending money at local businesses, occupying apartment complexes, using Charlotte’s airport – even attending NASCAR races, he said.

“All your uptown restaurants, you can see are full in the lunch hours, and that is a big business,” Bhatt said. “If you go to the EpiCentre Thursday, Friday, Saturday, you will see all foreign (H-1B) workers there during the evening hours.”

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/article132051484.html#storylink=cpy

15,000 American children going to college in Charlotte could be filling these jobs.

When we send jobs to other countries, we decrease the jobs available to Americans in America.

When we import non-immigrant guest workers on visas like the H-1B, we decrease the jobs available to Americans in America.

It really is that simple, and you need to think about it if you value your children’s future.

Friends at so Cal Edison have said its a disaster there, inefficient, no loyalty, offshore turn over, etc but they are sure the managers received their big bonuses.

A little food for thought.

es you hit it right on. Been saying this for years, its all corporate greed. You should send a copy to the president. I think we are now in the long run…meaning so many IT shops have outsourced there’s hardly any Americans left doing the work. Friends at so Cal Edison have said its a disaster there, inefficient, no loyalty, offshore turn over, etc but they are sure the managers received their big bonuses.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1487763804597717/permalink/1526758090698288/?comment_id=1526766897364074&reply_comment_id=1526907420683355&notif_t=group_comment_reply&notif_id=1486744364535216

 

But I saw the affected IT workers, people with gray hair, with families, children in college, people who really need a job and I felt like: ‘What am I doing here?”

What prompted you to write this book?

Instead of being an executive, sitting in a war room, looking at a spreadsheet where decisions can be made easier, I worked in the field. You see people suffering. You see people trying to resist and fight [the outsourcing of their jobs]. I see all the things that are going on behind the scenes. You deteriorate inside your heart. I couldn’t do it anymore, and took a leave of absence and wrote what’s inside my heart.

After a year, I went back to the job. I tried to get back to my work again. But I saw the affected IT workers, people with gray hair, with families, children in college, people who really need a job and I felt like: ‘What am I doing here?” I quit and then wrote a book to get my voice out.

What is the personal toll of this work?

Some companies feel they have no choice [to outsource], and need to fix the processes and save the money. They are trying to do something that appears as if they are transforming the business to a better position. That seems like a good reason for it, but I’m still not sure that’s the right solution.

The savings (per job) are 30% — if you offshore 100 people your savings is about $3 million. That’s a quick savings. But then at the beginning of the next year, after you have done all the offshoring, the CEO and executives take million dollar bonuses. This is just not right at all. That’s what is hurting me, this betrayal of loyal employees.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3066021/it-careers/former-insider-s-book-explores-morality-of-offshore-outsourcing.html

 

David Rutchik, do you really believe we will go quietly into the night?

Our lives are being totally destroyed as we are forced out of the software industry.

Nobody is finding jobs at any lower level as we are considered “overqualified” and the Calvary in the form of the U.S. Government has NOT come to our rescue.

This has backed us into a corner with nowhere to turn.

David Rutchik, executive managing director of business transformation and outsourcing at advisory firm Pace Harmon, believes that additional restrictions on H-1B visa use will have a “measured” impact on the industry.

Restrictions may prompt more U.S. hiring by outsourcing firms, but that “is something we think makes sense for their businesses anyway and should make them more competitive,” he said. It “would be a direct, positive impact of the revised visa provisions,” said Rutchik.

Conversely, the providers may also push more work offshore and try to eliminate U.S. jobs altogether. The offshore firms may rely more on robotic processes and artificial intelligence, he explained.

“Yes, they would likely hire more U.S. nationals, push more offshore, and accelerate automation efforts, but those would all be incremental modifications in the grand scheme of things,” Rutchik said.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3167586/it-outsourcing/trump-eyes-end-to-an-h-1b-system-that-favors-largest-outsourcers.html