It’s truly heartbreaking that you have IT workers going from supporting hospitals — and even our government — to waiting tables and losing their houses and going to apartments

“It’s truly heartbreaking that you have IT workers going from supporting hospitals — and even our government — to waiting tables and losing their houses and going to apartments,” Palmer said. “We did this to ourselves and it’s just — the abuse is rampant in every state and in every city.”

“And [the H-1B workers] don’t even know your job. Most of these H-1B workers, Laura, are 22 and 24 years old,” Palmer added. “And what’s even more appalling is — I’m going to be breaking some evidence in the next 4-6 weeks that shows … the fake resumes that these people are actually using.”

http://www.lifezette.com/polizette/h-1b-whistleblower-visa-abuse-rampant-every-state/

 

Where do I believe the 60 minute video came up short?

Where do I believe the 60 minute video came up short?

All in all I thought they did a fairly decent job.

Problem is, they are interviewing people who have only recently been displaced (don’t get me wrong, leo, jay, craig, and the others).

Sixty minutes did not tell the story that they have not, and can not find work anywhere near what they were doing, which means they will be left fighting to get hired at entry level jobs like my own personal fight with the Dept of Veterans Affairs.

Sixty minutes did not tell the story that they can’t find work because (a) our free trade agreements which companies like apple are exploiting in examples like the suicides at foxconn are DECREASING the jobs available here in America.

Sixty minutes did not tell the story that they can’t find work because (b) our non-immigrant guest worker agreements which companies like IBM are exploiting in examples that are too numerous to mention are DECREASING the jobs available here in America.

Sixty minutes did not question any of those in the over 50 and out of work series to find out if any of them have found work again.

“We need to stop the h1visa program,” says Palmer.

“For example workers would come over and if you had been working somewhere at a large company for twenty years you would have to train your replacement in order to get your pension, keep your insurance, or you would be fired immediately for not following policy,” says Palmer

Palmer says he and other panelists discuss how major companies have done exactly that.

“Disney is one of the biggest ones right now that has replaced American workers. There are several companies up in northeastern United States where electrical cooperative companies have replaced their workers,” says Palmer.

Among Palmer’s views on H-1B Visas, panelist share their own personal stories.

“The segment has some compelling stores of people who have lost everything. They’ve lost their houses, they lost their jobs, all in the name of big corporate greed. They’ve lost their houses, they lost their jobs, all in the name of big corporate greed,” says Palmer.

Palmer says the issue is a wake-up call for America.

“Really what I think I got the most out of it was some of the people that I had met and talked to over the phone for the last couple of years, that had been laid off – I got to meet them face to face,” says Palmer.

But what is the final solution?

“We need to stop the h1visa program,” says Palmer.

Palmer believes it’s very simple.

“I’m not against it but it needs to be stopped until we’ve reformed,” says Palmer.

The 60 Minutes segment featuring  Palmer airs Sunday on CBS 8 at 6 pm

http://www.alabamanews.net/2017/03/18/montgomery-immigration-consultant-featured-60-minutes-panelist-h-1b-visas/

 

The Indian university system, already bursting at the seams, will only grow more competitive.

India is set to become the largest country on Earth by 2022, with a population much younger than China’s. There aremore children under the age of 15 in India than there are people of any age in the United States. The Indian university system, already bursting at the seams, will only grow more competitive. The internationally renowned Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) each take a fraction of a percent of candidates. The IITs, with just a few thousand seats available, require two rounds of entrance examinations: the Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) Mains, taken by over 13 million candidates a year, and the JEE Advanced, for which around 10% of those (13 million) qualify. The most coveted course of study/major at IIT, computer science, is open only to the top 500 or so of over 1.3 million applicants. And even among IITs and IIMs, there is significant variation in quality and job placement.

Some new, western-style colleges (such as Ashoka University) have popped up with support from American colleges and universities, but it takes a long time to build international reputation and prestige, and in general liberal arts education is not perceived as valuable by the vast majority of Indians. While there may be a future for Indian liberal arts colleges, that future is still several years away. One issue India has is quality of life: with poor infrastructure, severe air quality issues, and extreme weather, it is difficult to attract top research and teaching talent to establish a truly international university. When it comes to convincing academics and administrators to move to India, the (actual) heat and smog don’t help! India shows a lot of potential to address these issues, but for families deciding on education for their kids in the next several years, that potential means little.

Because there are few high-quality post-secondary schools beyond the IITs and IIMs, parents and students look abroad. Other than the US, Canada, and the UK, Indian college applicants also look to universities in Singapore, Hong Kong, Germany, and the UAE. There are thriving Indian expatriate communities, which the Indian government calls “Non-Resident Indians” (NRIs) for civil purposes. These families, too, look for educational opportunities in their resident countries and beyond.

http://www.ivyachievement.com/indiaguide1/