My Story is NOT unique

As an example, we are told that small businesses create the majority of jobs.

Yet when we look at the IRS databook, we find the number of estimated tax filers has gone from 38,188,000 in 1990 to 22,387,449 in 2018 which is a decrease of 15,800,551.

And if we look at the number of 1040 tax filers, we find that in that same period, we have gone from 112,492,000 in 1990 to 152,937,949 in 2018 which is a increase of 40,445,949.

Unless those 15,800,551 are all dead, they must now be working on a 1040 basis for somebody.

So if we subtract that 15,800,551 from 40,445,949 we find that we really only have created 24,645,398 new jobs in the 28 years that we are looking at.

This is 880,192 jobs per year on average.

And our foreign born portion of the civilian labor force has gone from whatever it was when they started counting to 27,805,000 as of Nov 2018.

Click on picture to zoom in

If we subtract this 27,805,000 foreign born employed from the 24,645,398 new jobs we have created, does this mean that we have actually forced out 3,159,602 native born american workers?

Which leaves our large publicly traded companies.

Surely they must be creating the majority of jobs?

It appears that in 1996 we had 7,322 publicly traded companies

And in 2017 we had 3,671 publicly traded companies.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/where-have-all-the-public-companies-gone-1510869125

So if small business is not creating the majority of our jobs.

And if large publicly traded companies are not creating the majority of our jobs.

Is that why our homeless population is rapidly growing?

I do not know the answer to this, but this is why I seek those answers because I am one of many.

And that is why I want to be your Senator.

Because we need answers to these questions so that our citizens can provide for their families rather than being a homeless statistic that society has cast aside.